Economics of Conservation

An old fiction - that Montanans must choose between jobs and the environment - has been firmly put to rest by a growing body of economic research. While natural resource development remains an important and valuable contributor to Montana's economy, industrial practices such as mining and logging have become more environmentally benign over the years due to determined advocacy and cooperative partnerships with conservationists. These days, Montana's competitive advantage for attracting investment, businesses, and skilled high-tech workers lies in the environmental qualities and natural beauty of the state. This resource library is intended to serve as a repository for those stories and research. 

 
Resource Library: Economics of Conservation
As consumers, each of us can use our consumer power to demand local, sustainably raised food that benefits Montana and Montanans. If you can’t find local food, ask for...
 
Legacies and Projects: Celebrating a Success
The Ulring family of the J Bar L Ranch near Twin Bridges and the Jones family of Two Dot Land and Livestock Ranch near Harlowtown received great news from University of Montana...
 
Resource Library: Economics of Conservation
Over the past six years, hunting expenditures for big game, particularly elk, in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge have been on the rise despite the slow economy, according to data...
 
Resource Library: Economics of Conservation
A 2012 report by Montana economists concludes that protected lands in the state play a positive role in attracting people, investment, and businesses to Montana...
 
News, Events and Opinion: News
Jobs are blowing in with wind energy in north-central Montana. The growth of the wind energy sector . is generating high-paying jobs and increased tax revenue to cash-strapped...